School of Health, Community & Social Justice

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BC community care licensing officer program: phase one analysis
This study explores the nature and quality of JIBC’s Advanced Specialty Certificate in Community Care Licensing (ASCCCL) and more broadly the role of Community Care Licensing Officers (CCLO). CCLO are employed by provincial health authorities and play an important role in protecting vulnerable people. The roles include the following: inspect and monitor private and public facilities for child care, youth residential care, residential group care and long-term care in British Columbia (B.C.); investigate complaints; educate and support licensees; and bring facilities into compliance with the Acts and Regulations that govern them.
BC community care licensing officer study: phase one analysis
An investigation into the practice of community care facility licensing in British Columbia. The framework for analysis describes variations in licensing practice across BC, and what changes in practice occur as a result of Licensing Officers participating in the JIBC Advanced Specialty Certificate in Community Care Licensing Program.
Building personal resilience in paramedic students
Recent research suggests that paramedics may be at increased risk for developing work-related health issues. Paramedics appear to have an increased prevalence of early retirement based on medical grounds, a greater frequency of musculo-skeletal injuries, and an increased prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety (Sterud et al.,2006).
Building personal resilience in paramedic students
The present study examined the impact of a 6- to 8-hour, self-paced online resiliency training program to help students training to be Primary Care Paramedics (PCP) mitigate the risks associated with working in a trauma informed work setting. Of the 138 participants, 88 were male and 30 were female, with a mean age of 25.5 years. Of these, 81 students participated in the experimental group (who took the course), and 57 in the control group. Baseline demographic results were examined using bivariate comparisons between the control and experimental, and all were found to be statistically insignificant at p < 0.05 which suggests that there were no differences between the two groups on the pre-test demographic variables. Prior to the intervention there were no significant differences in total resilience or any of the sub-scales (selfreliance, meaningfulness, equanimity, perseverance, and existential aloneness). Following the resiliency training and the practicum experience, the experimental group scored better in total resilience and each of the sub-scores (p < 0.05) except meaningfulness. Results suggest that developing skills to mitigate and manage workplace trauma can reduce or help mitigate the negative impact of exposure to trauma and potentially reduce the risk of developing trauma related mental health problems which may impact the well-being and quality of life of students once employed as a paramedic
Commercial sexual exploitation: innovative ideas for working with children and youth
This document presents a provincial framework for working with commercially sexually exploited children and youth, and innovative ideas for programs to deal with this social problem. The framework has been designed to assist in the formulation of policy, strategies, and services to assist these young people, and to prevent future generations of young people from being commercially sexually exploited. It is hoped that this document will be used in the development of appropriate responses to the commercial sexual exploitation of children and youth, including program design and implementation, as well as training and education for those working with these young people.
Conceptualizing the impact of special events on community health service levels: an operational analysis
Mass gatherings (MG) impact their host and surrounding communities and with inadequate planning, may impair baseline emergency health services. Mass gatherings do not occur in a vacuum; they have both consumptive and disruptive effects that extend beyond the event itself. Mass gatherings occur in real geographic locations that include not only the event site, but also the surrounding neighborhoods and communities. In addition, the impact of small, medium, or large special events may be felt for days, or even months, prior to and following the actual events. Current MG reports tend to focus on the events themselves during published event dates and may underestimate the full impact of a given MG on its host community. In order to account for, and mitigate, the full effects of MGs on community health services, researchers would benefit from a common model of community impact. Using an operations lens, two concepts are presented, the “vortex” and the “ripple,” as metaphors and a theoretical model for exploring the broader impact of MGs on host communities. Special events and MGs impact host communities by drawing upon resources (vortex) and by disrupting normal, baseline services (ripple). These effects are felt with diminishing impact as one moves geographically further from the event center, and can be felt before, during, and after the event dates. Well executed medical and safety plans for events with appropriate, comprehensive risk assessments and stakeholder engagement have the best chance of ameliorating the potential negative impact of MGs on communities.
Defining and describing paramedic practice in Canada
Paramedicine is a rapidly evolving profession, with paramedics taking on new roles in a variety of non-traditional practice settings. As expectations have grown, so have paramedics’ capabilities and education. Yet, there is surprisingly little aggregated and available data to inform paramedicine’s growth. Health care in Canada is in the provincial jurisdiction, and there is considerable variation in scopes of practice, regulatory mechanisms, integration with other health and emergency services, and operational practices. Little infrastructure and few processes exist to gather and interpret data at the national level.
Defining paramedic practice in Canada: framing concepts
The Paramedic Association of Canada (PAC) has developed a new Canadian Paramedic Profile that will describe the roles that paramedics in Canada assume and the essential capabilities they require to perform those roles. The redeveloped framework is intended to reflect current and emerging paramedic practice.
Defining the discipline: roles and boundaries of paramedicine
While paramedicine is moving along the path towards recognition as a profession, there is little consensus on what constitutes the roles and the boundaries of paramedicine.
Empowerment of immigrant and refugee women who are victims of violence in their intimate relationships
The purpose of this research was to enhance our understanding of the unique experiences of immigrant and refugee women who were victims of violence in their intimate relationships, in order to: (1) determine what service delivery factors they found to be empowering and disempowering; and (2) develop recommendations based on the findings to more effectively facilitate their empowerment. Empowering practices were defined as those responses that helped immigrant and refugee women who are victims of violence keep themselves safe and move forward in their lives.
Empowerment of immigrant and refugee women who are victims of violence in their intimate relationships [executive summary]
The purpose of this research was to enhance our understanding of the unique experiences of immigrant and refugee women who were victims of violence in their intimate relationships, in order to: (1) determine what service delivery factors they found to be empowering and disempowering; and (2) develop recommendations based on the findings to more effectively facilitate their empowerment. Empowering practices were defined as those responses that helped immigrant and refugee women who are victims of violence keep themselves safe and move forward in their lives.
Empowerment of immigrant and refugee women who are victims of violence in their intimate relationships [final report]
The purpose of this research was to enhance our understanding of the unique experiences of immigrant and refugee women who were victims of violence in their intimate relationships, in order to: (1) determine what service delivery factors they found to be empowering and disempowering; and (2) develop recommendations based on the findings to more effectively facilitate their empowerment. Empowering practices were defined as those responses that helped immigrant and refugee women who are victims of violence keep themselves safe and move forward in their lives
EMS instructor qualifications and credentials survey
The goal of this research project was to establish a baseline description of existing standards for EMS instructor qualifications and credentials. The premise of the study is that EMS instructor qualifications and credentials vary between institutions who provide EMS education in Canada. The project was conducted through a partnership between the Society for Pre-hospital Educators in Canada (SPEC) and the Justice Institute of British Columbia – School of Health Sciences (JIBC).
EMS? Paramedicine? What’s in a name?
The question of what to call EMS or paramedicine was explored in a recent project undertaken by the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC). The project had the overall goal of developing priorities for engaging in research involving EMS Education. Part of the project involved exploring current conceptions and future directions for the field.
Excellence in paramedic education
Exploring the idea of competence and excellence in paramedic education is timely as stakeholders in Canadian EMS work with the Paramedic Association of Canada (PAC) to redevelop the National Occupational Competency Profile for Paramedics in Canada (NOCP).
Exploring the field: towards a program of research in paramedic education
This study was conducted as part of an ongoing project to develop a program of research for the Health Sciences Division (HSD) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia. The project identified three to five areas which the HSD will strategically engage in, actively seeking partnerships and funding for. A second goal involved identifying areas of “opportunistic interest” – potential topics or projects that the Division might engage in if external funding or opportunity presented itself. The third objective was to develop topics and projects that faculty and students could use for developing research and scholarly activity as part of their ongoing courses.
Four dimensions of paramedic practice in Canada: defining and describing the profession
A framework for describing four dimensions of paramedic practice: Practitioners, Practice Setting, Care and Patient Disposition. The framework emerged from a qualitative study conducted to identify potential research directions and opportunities to advance paramedicine and paramedic education at Justice Institute of British Columbia in Canada.
Four dimensions of paramedic practice in Canada: defining and describing the profession
This article presents a framework for describing four dimensions of paramedic practice: Practitioners, Practice Setting, Care and Patient Disposition. The framework emerged from a qualitative study conducted to identify potential research directions and opportunities to advance paramedicine and paramedic education at Justice Institute of British Columbia in Canada.

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