School of Public Safety

Characteristics of the grey fleet in British Columbia
Data from around the world would suggest that attention to safety during work-related driving should be a priority as traffic accidents are the leading cause of work-related injury, death and absence from work in many countries. This study examines the characteristics of the grey fleet, and the road safety programs that are presently in place in British Columbia.
Characteristics of the grey fleet in British Columbia
The Grey Fleet Research Project: Literature Review – December, 2012 (Road Safety at Work, 2012: p1) suggests that the “management of grey fleet vehicles presents a multi‐faceted challenge, as the organization typically has more control over the choice and working condition of its company vehicles… but many do not have any measures in place to manage the grey fleet”. It is the purpose of this project to examine the characteristics of the grey fleet, and the road safety programs that are presently in place in British Columbia.
Characteristics of the grey fleet in British Columbia
The purpose of this project was to examine selected characteristics of the Grey Fleet and related road safety programs that are presently in place in British Columbia: 1. Define the size of the Grey Fleet in BC, 2. Define how often and for what purpose worker-owned vehicles are used, 3. Define current road safety management programs/safe work practices for the Grey Fleet.
Characteristics of the grey fleet in British Columbia
Data from around the world would suggest that attention to safety during work-related driving should be a priority as traffic accidents are the leading cause of work-related injury, death and absence from work in many countries. This study examines the characteristics of the grey fleet, and the road safety programs that are presently in place in British Columbia.
Characteristics of the grey fleet in British Columbia
Background: Data from around the world would suggest that attention to safety during work-related driving should be a priority as traffic accidents are the leading cause of work-related injury, death and absence from work in many countries. Purpose: This study examines the characteristics of the grey fleet (those who drive personal vehicles for the purposes of work), and the road safety programs that are presently in place in British Columbia. Method: A ‘Grey Fleet Employer Survey’ was distributed via email to a random sample of 15% of all employers in British Columbia Of 5023 emails delivered successfully 531 respondents were captured in the data (10.6% response), of which 104 declined participation leaving 427 who completed surveys (8.4% response rate). Results: Of those companies responding 64.4% of them reported having a grey fleet with 36.6% of employees from small companies (4-19 employees), 21.0% of the employees from medium (20-99 employees) and 12.2% of employees from large (100+ employees) companies driving personal vehicles for work-related purposes. Of those employers reporting a grey fleet 75.2% checked to make sure employees who drove had a valid drivers’ licence, typically at the time of hire (70.5), with 39% checking on an annual basis. Few companies (17.8%) required employees to inspect their own vehicles before starting each trip. The majority of employers (74.6%) believed it was the employee’s responsibility to inspect their own private vehicles, and this was true across small (73.6%), medium (73.6%) and large (77.8%) employers. Conclusion: Employers who use grey fleets are not certain of their legal requirements under Worker’s Compensation Act (duty of care), and education and training is required concerning the employer and employee responsibilities concerning driving safety.
Critical infrastructure assessment tool for local governments in Canada
In 2014-2015, representatives from the JIBC Emergency Management Division and the Centre for Applied Research engaged with Emergency Management British Columbia and Defence Research and Development Canada – Centre for Security Science on the development and completion of a critical infrastructure assessment tool for use by local governments. The aim of the tool is to enhance a municipality’s awareness and understanding of CI, and assist them with identifying and analyzing their assets, outputs goods and services, relevant hazards that may impact their assets, and the dependencies among assets, output goods & services, external CI service providers, and the community.
Critical infrastructure assessments for local governments
Resilience assessments of locally-owned critical infrastructures can be overwhelming for community members. Defense Research and Development Canada engaged with Emergency Management British Columbia and the Justice Institute of BC (JIBC) to develop a user-friendly critical infrastructure assessment process for local governments.
The effectiveness of current fire fighter rapid intervention teams
The purpose of a Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) is to locate and rescue lost, trapped, and/or injured fire fighters at an emergency scene. The main research goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of current Rapid Intervention Team protocols and then provide practical recommendations that fire departments could use to improve current RIT policies and practices. This study set out to determine the effectiveness of a 2 person RIT team compared with a 4 person team. Results from the study demonstrated that a 2 person RIT team may not be able to rescue a downed or trapped fire fighter, and will not be able to rescue two or more trapped fire fighters.
The effectiveness of current fire fighter rapid intervention teams
The research problem investigated was to evaluate the effectiveness of current Rapid Intervention Team protocols and then provide practical recommendations that fire departments can use to improve current RIT policies and practices. The study specifically tried to determine the effectiveness of a 2 person RIT team compared to a 4 person team during various downed fire fighter scenarios. Some research suggests that current RIT teams staffed with only 2 fire fighters may be dangerously inadequate.
The effectiveness of current fire fighter rapid intervention teams
Rapid Intervention Teams (RITs) are teams of two or more fire fighters designated to be on standby at an emergency scene in the event that other fire fighters become lost, trapped or injured and need to be rescued. This project conducted trials of rescue scenarios with two and four person RITs to compare their effectiveness and explore the limitations of two person teams. The researchers recommend a number of improvements to RIT policies and practices based on the findings.
Final report: the effectiveness of current fire fighter rapid intervention teams
The purpose of a Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) is to locate and rescue lost, trapped, and/or injured fire fighters at an emergency scene. The main research goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of current Rapid Intervention Team protocols and then provide practical recommendations that fire departments could use to improve current RIT policies and practices. This study set out to determine the effectiveness of a 2 person RIT team compared with a 4 person team. Results from the study demonstrated that a 2 person RIT team may not be able to rescue a downed or trapped fire fighter, and will not be able to rescue two or more trapped fire fighters.
On-road driving assessment of older adults
There is concern within society that a “gold standard” has not been developed for assessing on-road driving errors for the aging driver.
On-­road driving assessment of older adults: a review of the literature
The components included in an on-road assessment will depend on the specific target group of older adults to be assessed and the intended purpose of the evaluation. Many different approaches are reflected in the literature and some well-developed standardized measures are available, though none are generally accepted as the “gold standard”. The key features to be considered in designing or evaluating an on-road assessment procedure relate to course design (e.g., location of assessment, duration of testing, and route characteristics), and driving behaviors and scoring of driving errors (e.g., raters, subjective and objective measures). The characteristics of the route (e.g., four-way stop intersections, yield situations, merge situations) will necessarily influence the driving behaviors elicited and scored to determine the outcome of the assessment (e.g., pass/fail). The scoring mechanisms can be subjective ratings involving observation and some degree of judgment on the part of the examiner, or objective measurements, derived from instruments that record various aspects of driving behavior such as Global Positioning Systems, video-cameras, sensors, accelerometers, computers, and radar and video lane tracking systems. Other important considerations, when designing or evaluating older driver assessment procedures, include retraining and embedding on-road assessment within a broader comprehensive evaluation of driver safety.
Outbreak orange: considering the psychosocial in a pandemic
SIMTEC is a multi-year project, based at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), which will assist Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) personnel to consider psychosocial dimensions during an emergency. The project involves designing and conducting simulation exercises with complex disaster scenarios and specific inputs to elicit psychosocial responses from senior decision-makers in the EOC. Outbreak Orange was the fourth in a series of tabletop simulation exercises. This exercise focused on EOCs and health EOCs and the development of protocols and procedures to manage a pandemic event. Our intent was to examine the EOC members’ ability to devise plans and make decisions that address the psychosocial need of the community and their colleagues.
Use of on-road evaluations for identification of impairment and retraining of older drivers
An overview of significant driver behaviour components, identified from 3 areas of study pertaining to on-road evaluations for identification of impairment and retraining of older drivers